Papa-Lu: April 2007 Archives

Papal Prayer Intentions

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Here are Pope Benedict's prayer intentions for May:

General intention: That, following the example of the Virgin Mary, all Christians should allow themselves to be guided by the Word of God and always remain attentive to the signs of the Lord in his own life.

Missionary intention: That in mission territories there may be no lack of good and enlightened teachers in the major seminaries and in the institutes of consecrated life.

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Prayers for a house!

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Many of our friends and family know that we're looking to by a house this spring.

This is a little bit late, but we're praying a novena to St. Joseph and we'd be delighted if any of you would like to join us in asking for his help.

We're praying the following novena prayer, but if you could just add us to your intentions, that would be more than enough!

Our Father
Hail Mary
Glory Be

St. Joseph, you are the faithful protector and intercessor of all who love and venerate you. I have a special confidence in you. You are powerful with God and will never abandon your faithful servants.

I humbly invoke you and commend myself, with all who are dear to me, to your intercession. By the love you have for Jesus and Mary, do not abandon me during life, and assist me at the hour of my death.

Glorious St. Joseph, spouse of the immaculate Virgin, Foster-father of Jesus Christ, obtain for me a pure, humble, and charitable mind, and perfect resignation to the Divine Will. Be my guide, my father, and my model through life that I may merit to die as you did in the arms of Jesus and Mary.

Loving St. Joseph, faithful follower of Jesus Christ, I raise my heart to you to implore your powerful intercession in obtaining from the Heart of Jesus all the graces necessary for my spiritual and temporal welfare, particularly the grace of a happy death, and the special grace I now implore: that we may find the right house for our family.

Guardian of the Word Incarnate, I am confident that your prayers in my behalf will be graciously heard before the throne of God.

And no, we will not be burying a statue of him upside down anywhere!

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MJ's son to play at U of I

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8 or 9 years ago, this news would have made very, very excited.

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Coming soon to NYC

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Quote of the day

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"It is as if pop chaos theory met Cold War paranoia and had a brief tryst in the supply closet at an establishment foreign policy think tank, resulting in the birth of modern interventionism."

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High Ground

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Christianity Today has a convincing article arguing against putting post-abortion syndrome at the center of the abortion debate.

I think it's good to talk about PAS to the extent that we don't pretend that's the extent of or even the foundational pro-life concern. The problem with abortion is that it kills a human person, period, end of sentence. It can additionally lead to physical and psychological stress and illness, and pro-lifers should talk about that and definitely should reach out to those so affected, but if we omit the fact that the abortion is wrong as a matter of principle we present an incomplete and dishonest picture.

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This is how it looks

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A great column from Roger Ebert. He's had multiple surgeries, first to remove and then unsuccessfully to replace part of his jaw that was affected by cancer of the salivary glands (which sounds excruciatingly painful). He is going to make his scheduled appearance at his annual "Overlooked Film Festival" here in Champaign, despite having a piece of his jaw missing and being unable to talk.

I was told photos of me in this condition would attract the gossip papers. So what?

I have been very sick, am getting better and this is how it looks. I still have my brain and my typing fingers.

Cubbie hat-tip: Amy Welborn

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Pilgrimage

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Pope Benedict XVI took a weekend jaunt up to Pavia this weekend to venerate the remains of St. Augustine, Bishop, Doctor of the Church, and patron saint of beer brewers (well, among many other things). Much has been made (to the point of beating a dead horse) about his preference for Augustine over, say

The American Papist (who I just realized is Ed Peters' son) has pictures and links.

Zenit has an interview with Father Rovert Prevost, prior general of the Augustinians, who invited the pope to visit Augustine's tomb.

If you scroll to the bottom of this page you can find some unofficial translations of the Holy Father's addresses.

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Interesting

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Two years ago now, after the First Vespers of this Feast, John Paul II ended his earthly life. In dying, he entered the light of Divine Mercy, of which, beyond death and starting from God, he now speaks to us in a new way.

Interesting words from a pope famously precise about his use of language. I'm just sayin'.

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Ed Emberley

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Profiled on the Boston Globe.

Ed Emberley is the patron saint of parents who can't draw.

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What do you say?

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When your toddler wakes up and tells you, "I dreamed about God!"

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Who are these people?

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Tom Wolfe on hedge fund managers. Frightening and hilarious.

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Ha!

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If Imus Had Called Mother Teresa a "Ho" He’d Still Have a Job

He draws largely on Bill Donohue, who, despite making me crazy sometimes, has a job for a reason.

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Cruel

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My dark side

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Sometimes a certain kind of blogpost can make me remember how low an opinion I have of humanity (in practice, as opposed to as created and willed by God, of course).

I'm not saying I have a low opinion of the blogger, I'm saying see the comment at around 11:51:48.

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Peggy

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Noonan is excellent on Virginia Tech.

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What a Shame

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Some Chicago guy sneaked into a closed down Chicago church to take pictures. The result benefits us all. Why oh why!?

Link courtesy of Daniel Mistsui, who got it from the Society of St. Barbara.

The church's name, by the way, is St. Boniface.

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Partial Birth

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Remember when you read and listen to and watch all of the "Oh the horrror!" editorials and news reports and other media coverage of the Partial Birth decision that all the fist-shaking and rhetoric about "activist" courts is basically saying that banning this is a bad thing.

I've written before that there are dangers in focusing on partial-birth abortion because it's just one procedure, and to say that an abortion procedure is bad is to an extent to imply that the idea of abortion itself isn't so bad if it's done the right way. (In fact you have to assume that since opposition to partial birth abortion is higher than opposition to abortion in general, there are certain people who do believe this. People can be incredibly unthoughtful.)

Without retracting what I wrote (since I stil believe that there was shameful cynicism on the part of some supporters of the PBABA), I have to say I'm pleased by the Supreme Court's decision. As minor of an effect as it will have, it is a real step towards sanity in our abortion law. I hold little hope that in my lifetime we'll see unborn children accorded full legal protection, but even to get to the point where our laws reflect the general beliefs of the people would be nice.

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That's a good start

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Supreme Court upholds Partial Birth Abortion Ban Act!

I'm genuinely happy, but I also think Mark Shea has a sharp take. This is a bare minimum.

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Dear Single Men:

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I know there are many of you out there who hope one day to meet and marry Ms. Right. Should the time come when you wish to make a proposal for life-long sacramental companionship, use this post as a guide on how to go about it.

Oh, and while you're there, you may want to congratulate the groom-to-be. :)

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Readin' around

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  • "Here Lies England" - Ostensibly about England, the post by Anthony Esolen also contains the best take on the whole stupid Don Imus incident I've seen.
  • This is insane - The Soul of the Commuter. Probably the biggest reason I don't miss Chicago
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The Children of Hurin

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Tolkien geeks, rejoice!

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Happy Birthday Holy Father!

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Today Pope Benedict XVI celebrates his eightieth birthday. Yesterday he celebrated Mass in St. Peter's to mark that occsaion as well as the second anniversary (April 19th) of his pontificate.

Gerald of the closed cafeteria was there and has photos. So was/does Fr. Z.

In commemoration, the mainstream press has spent the last three weeks telling us that the pope is MIA, backward, old, and an intolerant jerk.

And many more!

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Now that's just not nice

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On suffering

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On this Friday*, I have two links for you on suffering:

  • Jose granados starts developing a "Theology of the Suffering Body" in an article from the Winter issue of Communio
  • Rob Vischer, law professor and blogger at Mirror of Justice, takes a look at how the rebuilding of N'awlins could benefit from a dose of the Catholic social teaching - specifically the principle of subsidiarity.

* Yeah, yeah, I know it's Easter Friday and so not really penitential, but this is all really about coincidental timing anyway.

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Rest in Peace

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Sr. Ann Thole, who died March 31st while trying to rescue patients from a fire that engulfed the AIDS hospice where she worked.

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This looks fun

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Those hi-tech Filipino bishops

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A couple of years ago, a few bishops from the Phillipines started blogs. Well, they've gone a step further: this year, they started video blogging for Holy Week.

Get the story.
Watch the videos.

Here's a sample:

It's this year's Easter Vigil homily delivered by Manila Archbishop Gaudencio Cardinal Rosales.

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Street Music

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The WaPo persuaded one of the best violinists in the world to play in a D.C. subway station. The write-up is a very enjoyable read.

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Perfect Monday reading!

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Touchstone

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When a new issue of Touchstone magazine comes out, they usually post two or three articles online for non-subscribers to read, which is a common and rational thing to do, since you generally want people to subscribe to your magazine instead of just giving away the contents for free.

BUT, if you check out their archives, you'll see that in addition to posting those couple of articles every month, they also post the entire issue of two years earlier. Knowing this, you can go here and see they they have the entire April 2005 issue available. Which means you can read this essay by Anthony Esolen on living the Sabbath as a way of life and not just by staying home on Sundays and this piece by Dawn Eden exposing the sickness of Planned Parenthood's TeenWire site.

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Welcoming our new brothers and sisters

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If the stats are anything like last year's, we can expect that over 80,000 adults were Baptized into the Catholic Church on Saturday and over 70,000 already baptized adults came into the Church.

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An Easter story

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The Denver Catholic Register has a pretty amazing story of a man with AIDS who is joining the Church this year after being cared for by the Missionaries of Charity.

Happy Easter everybody!

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Oh please, say it's so

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I haven't done much Cubbie-blogging this spring, as I've been incredibly busy. You may have heard that the Cubs are on the auction block since the folks who are buying out the Tribune company have this silly idea that media folks should stick to media and not be running baseball teams.

Today, Chris DeLuca of the SunTimes notes that baseball guru and Cubs zealot Steve Stone, the anti-Dusty, is having his cell phone overheated from prospective buyers wanting to bend his ear. Stone also expresses interest in a high-level job with a future owner. "I would like to think that whoever gets the team, if he did his homework around the Chicago area, he would find that I would have something to lend to that group."

That might sound a little arrogant, but any serious Cubs fan would have to agree. The added bonus in all of this is that with Stone occupying a high ranking position, we'd have to say goodbye to Hendry.

Oh please, let it be so.

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St. Pat's

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The NY Sun praises "The Majesty of St. Patrick's" in New York.

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The awesomest take on the hostage release

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From Steve Sailer:

As your mother might say, "Now, isn't that nicer than fighting WWIII?" This was shaping up to be the stupidest conflict since the War of Jenkin's Ear, but, fortunately, sanity prevailed, although, as happens distressingly frequently, Iran's President Borat gets to act saner than America's President Bush.

President Borat! That's better than anything Mark Steyn has come up with.

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Catholic Blogging in Japan

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NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOooooooooooooooo

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Champaign Police Increasing Patrols for Speeding

This is my doom. Of course, the car I drive now is slightly less of a hoopty cop-magnet than the one I got 4 tickets in 24 months in, so here's hoping!

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Sufficient Distance

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David of CLS reports on two speakers the University of Illinois hosted last week: Fr. Charles Curran and Daniel Dennett. A gruesomer twosome I can scarcely imagine. Was Peter Singer all booked up? That would have been quite a trifecta!

Speaking of Dennett, Orthodox writer David B. Hart had some fun with Dennett's latest book in the January First Things.

A taste:

The catalogue of complaints that might be brought against Breaking the Spell is large, though no doubt many of them are trivial. The most irksome of the book’s defects are Dennett’s gratingly precious rhetorical tactics, such as his inept and transparent attempt, on the book’s first page, to make his American readers feel like credulous provincials for not having adopted the European’s lofty disdain for religion. Or his use of the term brights to designate atheists and secularists of his stripe (which reminds one of nothing so much as the sort of names packs of popular teenage girls dream up for themselves in high school, but which also-in its favor-is so resplendently asinine a habit of speech that it has the enchanting effect of suggesting precisely the opposite of what Dennett intends).

There are also the embarrassing moments of self-delusion, as when Dennett, the merry "Darwinian fundamentalist," claims that atheists-unlike persons of faith-welcome the ceaseless objective examination of their convictions, or that philosophers are as a rule open to all ideas (which accords with no sane person’s experience of either class of individuals). And then there is his silly tendency to feign mental decrepitude when it serves his purposes, as when he pretends that the concept of God possesses too many variations for him to keep track of, or as when he acts scandalized by the revelation that academic theology sometimes lapses into a technical jargon full of obscure Greek terms like apophatic and ontic. And there are the historical errors, such as his ludicrous assertion that the early Christians regarded apostasy as a capital offense.

The prose is rebarbative, moreover, and the book is unpleasantly shapeless: It labors to begin and then tediously meanders to an inconclusive conclusion. There is, as well, the utter tone-deafness evident in Dennett’s attempts to describe how persons of faith speak or think, or what they have been taught, or how they react to challenges to their convictions. He even invents an antagonist for himself whom he christens Professor Faith, a sort of ventriloquist’s doll that he compels to utter the sort of insipid bromides he imagines typical of the believer’s native idiom.

And that's before he gets to the Dennett's actual arguments.

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April Prayer Intentions

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Here are the Holy Father's prayer intentions for April:

General Prayer Intention: That, allowing himself to be enlightened and guided by the Holy Spirit, every Christian may answer enthusiastically and faithfully to the universal call to sanctity.

Mission Intention: That the number of priestly and religious vocations may grow in North America and the countries of the Pacific Ocean, in order to give an adequate answer to the pastoral and missionary needs of those populations.

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Krauthammer's Thought Experiment

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Thought experiment: Bring in a completely neutral observer — a Martian — and point out to him that the United States is involved in two hot wars against radical Islamic insurgents. One is in Afghanistan, a geographically marginal backwater with no resources, no industrial and no technological infrastructure. The other is in Iraq, one of the three principal Arab states, with untold oil wealth, an educated population, an advanced military and technological infrastructure which, though suffering decay in the later Saddam years, could easily be revived if it falls into the right (i.e. wrong) hands. Add to that the fact that its strategic location would give its rulers inordinate influence over the entire Persian Gulf region, including Saudi Arabia, Kuwait ,and the Gulf states. Then ask your Martian: Which is the more important battle? He would not even understand why you are asking the question.

Al Qaeda has provided the answer many times. Osama bin Laden, the one whose presence in Afghanistan presumably makes it the central front in the war on terror, has been explicit that “the most serious issue today for the whole world is this Third World War that is raging in Iraq.” Al Qaeda's No. 2, Ayman al-Zawahiri, has declared that Iraq “is now the place for the greatest battle of Islam in this era.”

Alleged intellectual Krauthammer apparently thinks we can take Osama bin Laden's words at face value. Surely, the man with a multi-million dollar bounty on his head has no vested interest in keeping the full force of American military strength away from his cave! Or maybe, just maybe al Qaeda has learned our grand defense strategy: "fight them over there so we don't have to fight them here."

Larison puts it this way:

If you were to then tell the “Martian” the rest of the information that would show the true significance of the two theaters, even the “Martian” would have to agree that Krauthammer doesn’t understand the first thing about geopolitics or strategy. What rather strategically significant country borders Afghanistan and could be affected rather signficantly by a resurgent Taliban in the borderlands? That would be Pakistan. That would be the Pakistan that has a nuclear arsenal, and which has a highly unstable authoritarian government and the Inter-Services Intelligence branch that is heavily compromised by sympathies with and ties to jihadis forged over decades of sponsoring jihadis in Afghanistan and India. Western Pakistan also now serves as the base for the Taliban and, to the extent that it is centered anywhere, the center of the leadership of Al Qaeda. Of course top Al Qaeda figures would talk up Iraq as the main front–all other things being equal, if you could convince your stupid enemy to fight you far away from where you are and make him think that he was dealing you a death blow in the process, you would do this, especially when the effect of this is to reduce his attention on the far more pivotal battle going on in the supposed backwater.
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X is the new Y

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A thought: subprime mortages are the new stocks-on-margin. Good people were enticed by profiteers to throw money they did not have at a booming market only to find themselves with nothing when the market took a downturn I don't think we're headed for another depression, but the psychology of incurring unmanageable debt based on the assumption that the investment will increase in value is pretty much the same thing.

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Blogwatch

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  • Permanent Scars - "A Church that is not permanently scarred is not the Body of Christ." Rich sustenance for us doom and gloomers.
  • New Blog: Catholic Dads - because all these Catholic mom bloggers are surely married to somebody, right?
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About this Archive

This page is a archive of recent entries written by Papa-Lu in April 2007.

Papa-Lu: March 2007 is the previous archive.

Papa-Lu: May 2007 is the next archive.

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