Papa-Lu: March 2007 Archives

Down South

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John Allen has been in South America researching his next book and has been writing up a storm about the Church there. Great stuff.

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On the radio tonight

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For those in the range of WGN-AM 720 (I've received it clar as a bell until about an hour outside of Nashville, TN in December) should listen in tonight at 9 PM. Extension 720 is going to have David Blankenhorn and Elizabeth Marquardt from the Institute for American Values (which is neither as right-wing nor as Orwellian as it sounds) who also blog at the Institute's Family Scholars weblog.

Host Milt Rosenberg is a media legend and a highly skilled interview, while Blankenhorn and Marquardt are highly-esteemed scholars on marriage and family issues. Should be good.

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Theodicy for dummies

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Recently read and enjoyed

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Waste of Space

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If you really like the book, why oh why on earth do you spend the first 20% of your review blabbing about what bad books in that genre are like?

Rambling, self-absorbed travel writing is published all too often these days. These narratives foreground the writer, not the place; when local color manages to creep into the prose, it often reveals the writer's ignorance. Encounters with locals take the form of sumptuous meals in tourist-friendly restaurants, posited as the reward after a day haggling in the kasbah.

"Rambling?" "self-absorbed?" "All too often?" Agreed.

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What's your diocese's summer catechetical program?

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Whatever it is, I bet it's not based on Deus Caritas Est.

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Even More Obama

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Over lunch I read the Rolling Stone profile of Obama from... er... I don't know, maybe February. Interesting fellow, that Obama:

When Obama is finished with his meeting, he comes out of a hut: a skinny American dude, looking more like thirty-five than forty-five, his face treadmilled-thin, all teeth and cheekbones, holding a megaphone at his side. The roar is deafening. For a second, Obama looks stunned. He lifts the megaphone to his lips, but he can't make himself heard. When he lowers it, he's grinning. For the first time, it seems as if some resistance has broken in Obama: His reluctance has been replaced by something deeper and more spontaneous. He raises the megaphone again. "Hello!" he calls out in the local dialect. The wave of sound that greets him is awesome. He half-loses it, just starts yelling into the megaphone: "Everyone here is my brother! Everyone here is my sister! I love Kibera!" The crowd is so loud that he can't be heard more than twenty feet from where he is standing, and so he begins to wade into the crowd, shouting into the megaphone again and again: "You are all my brothers and sisters!" The look on his face is one of pure joy. Months later, his eyes still glitter when he recalls the sheer spectacle of it all. "It was a remarkable experience," he says.

I started thinking about this in relation to Steve Sailer's piece from last month. Sailer casts Obama's story as one of racial anxieties and antagonisms, which is understandable since so much of the hype around Obama is P.C.-ishly racial. But I think the root problem is something different - related perhaps to the point of inseparability, but different.

Obama is simply a child of a broken family.

His backstory reads like a textbook case study of a screwed-up divorced child: his mother, born in Kansas, moves to Hawaii as a child. As an 18 year-old freshman at the University of Hawaii, she meets and married a Kenyan, who becomes Obama's father. Obama Sr. abandons the family when Barack is two, his mother remarries, uproots him to Indonesia for four years, then ships him back to live with her parents in Hawaii, where he wins a scholarship to a posh prep school. Sure, race and class questions must have been in the child's head, but it's hard to imagine that the turmoil of divorce, and separation from both parents wasn't the root cause of his angst.

Sailer, in discussing Obama's years at the Punahou school, says:

In Obama’s eighth grade class picture, at least seven and perhaps as many as ten of the 21 students are non-white. Brian Charlton of the AP threw some cold water on Obama’s adolescent alienation fantasies: “He was known as Barry Obama, and with his dark complexion and mini-Afro, he was one of the few blacks at the privileged Hawaiian school overlooking the Pacific. Yet that hardly made him stand out. Diversity was the norm at the Punahou School, one of the state’s top private schools.” His classmates say he was a popular and cheerful figure, the opposite of the tortured personality described in Dreams, in which he rationalizes his teenage drug use as “something that could push questions of who I was out of my mind . . .”

Children of even the most amicable divorces (to the extent those exist) can tell you all about identity crises, confusion and rebellion, and particularly about "having to choose." In Obama's situation, both of his parents were off in other countries living new lives with new families that apparently had no room for young Barack. It seems perfectly natural that he would harbor resentment for and eventually rebel against the white grandparents who ended up raising him and "choose" to identify with his African heritage. This doesn't make teenage Obama disingenuous or opportunistic, it makes him a child, vulnerable and insecure. Being a child of a biracial divorce provides ample fuel for questions of identity. Even the drug use is absolutely predictable.

Honestly, all of the talk about Obama's race is boring as hell. It would be far more interesting to hear him start talking about being a child of divorce, how it felt to have parents who had agendas that didn't include him, and dealing with the resulting inner conflict and the search for the rootedness that comes from a stable family.My whole generation could relate to that. It would throw the excerpt I started off with into a new and much more fascinating light and even Obama's conversion to Christianity would be given an added dimension many can relate to. Unfortunately, "Broken families really, really screw kids up" doesn't focus-group too well.

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That's one way to do it

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Phillipines preschool director takes kids hostage to demand more funding.

The school head who identified himself as Jun Ducat, has called a Manila radio station and demanded free education as well as free housing for a group of 145 preschoolers at Musmos Day Care Centre he runs in the city's depressed Tondo district, including the hostages.

In his radio discourse, Ducat pledged to "surrender" peacefully if his demands were met. "I love these children,” he said “that's why I am here. I will not start any shooting”.

Senator Alfredo Lim, a former Manila police chief, said Mr Ducat has a history of seeking attention. He held hostage two Catholic priests elsewhere in Manila in 1987 using fake grenades over a building contract dispute. The priests were later freed unharmed. “I'm sure this will end peacefully as well,” he said.

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24

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So is 24 liberal or conservative? Schizophrenic, I'd say.

Maybe, just maybe, they use Americans' anger and anxiety about terrorism and politics as tools to gain viewers and make themselves rich. This is television we're talking about after all. Is it so hard to understand?

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Some links for you

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Blogwatch

Other stuff

  • Eric Cohen and Yuval Levin on healthcare - Their solutions aren't all that convincing, but they have the right idea of identifying that there are multiple healthcare problems that need different solutions.

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Through kids' eyes

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The New Yorker's humor pieces are often painful, but this one is a must-read.

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Noonan, Reagan

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Catching up on what I missed around the web. Here's Peggy Noonan on Reagan and Republicans.

Could I be correct that they only front-page weeping Republicans, and only laud conservatives when they're dead?

I refer of course to this past week's Time magazine cover, which had a picture of Ronald Reagan with a tear drawn in, to illustrate a piece on the current Republican Party. Actually it was a good piece in that it suggested a simple truth: The portion of the Republican Party that is based in and lives off the American capital has lost its way. They used to stand for conservative principles and now they stand for--well, whatever it is they stand for. I've written the past few years that the modern Democratic Party has been undone in part by its successes, that it achieved what it worked for in terms of Social Security, the safety net and civil rights, and that a great coalition has now devolved into a mere conglomeration of interest groups. I don't see why Time shouldn't similarly indict the Republicans.

It gets better. It's hard for me to think positively about Reagan, because growing up, I don't think anybody I knew (except maybe Tony Duarte) liked him. Peggy Noonan occasionally helps me get over that somewhat.

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Surfacing Briefly

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Hey y'all!

I've been pretty busy for a couple of weeks. First I had an out of town conference, and then I was home for a couple of days before escaping for a quick mini-vacation. I'm back now, but strill incredibly busy at work and likely to remain so through, oh, approximately April 16th. I will continue to blog, but it will be even more sporadic than usual.

Check back tomorrow (or later in the week - I said it would be sporadic) for pictures from the impromptu jaunt to the woods.

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Here and There

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Blogwatch

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That Obama Article

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Surely this article on Barack Obama by Steve Sailer from The American Conservative will be creating a great deal of buzz over the coming weeks. Sailer is characteristically blunt in speaking about race, which is usually refreshing, but occasionally toes the line of being out of bounds. You will wince several times reading it. All in all it's a good read, laying waste to much of the Obama mythology.

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The Redemption of Web 2.0

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Archbishop Fulton Sheen on YouTube.

Hat-tip: Dawn Eden, who also points us to a place to purchase DVDs and CDs of the late great Sheen as well as to the homepage of his cause, where if you purchase tapes or videos of him, 10% of the price goes towards his cause.

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Dawn Eden in Champaign

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In about 30 minutes from now (@7:30 PM Central Time), author and blogger Dawn Eden will be in Champaign giving a talk at St. John's Catholic Newman Center on chastity. Dawn will also be helping preach the chastity gospel during the U of I's sex fair tomorrow.

Also, see John Bambenek's guest column in the DI on chastity and Eden's book.

I know, it's late. I work, sue me.

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Dear 3M

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I appreciate your concern for my convenience, but if I need 4 freaking copies of the same $25 invoice, I can use the photocopier. Our office is high-tech like that. Save a tree the indignity of becoming a superfluous "remittance copy."

Yours,
Papa-Lu

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Putin Meets the Pope

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PP.jpg

In addition to the release of Sacramentum Carititatis, today was also a noteworthy day in the Vatican due to the metting of Russian president Vladimir Putin with the pope.

Here's an AFP story.

And here's analysis from AsiaNews.

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More on Sacramentum Caritatis

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Sacramentum Caritatis

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POST-SYNODAL
APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
SACRAMENTUM CARITATIS
OF THE HOLY FATHER
BENEDICT XVI
TO THE BISHOPS, CLERGY,
CONSECRATED PERSONS
AND THE LAY FAITHFUL
ON THE EUCHARIST
AS THE SOURCE AND SUMMIT
OF THE CHURCH'S LIFE AND MISSION

INTRODUCTION

1. The sacrament of charity (1), the Holy Eucharist is the gift that Jesus Christ makes of himself, thus revealing to us God's infinite love for every man and woman. This wondrous sacrament makes manifest that "greater" love which led him to "lay down his life for his friends" (Jn 15:13). Jesus did indeed love them "to the end" (Jn 13:1). In those words the Evangelist introduces Christ's act of immense humility: before dying for us on the Cross, he tied a towel around himself and washed the feet of his disciples. In the same way, Jesus continues, in the sacrament of the Eucharist, to love us "to the end," even to offering us his body and his blood. What amazement must the Apostles have felt in witnessing what the Lord did and said during that Supper! What wonder must the eucharistic mystery also awaken in our own hearts!

The whole document may be found here.

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Racing Robots

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Oh how nice. The DI has an article about the robot race that was featured at the U of I Engineering Open House.

Funny thing about those engineers, though. You'd think they'd understand that when the program for the day says there will be robots from 9 AM - 4 PM, that people might just show up at, say, around 3 PM EXPECTING TO SEE ROBOTS. And by "see robots" I mean see them do robot stuff, not see them being packed up for the day and rolled out of the arena.

Jerks.

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Cantius

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A transitional deacon of the Society of St. John Cantius writes about reclaiming the Catholic heritage of sacred music in Adoremus.

Realizing that the future of the Church rests with our children, the parish decided it was of supreme importance to form a choir for children and youth. The Chorus Innocentium Sanctorum (Choir of Holy Innocents), from its inception, has sought to teach the children of the parish the Church’s heritage of liturgical music. The choir includes youth from ages six to eighteen. Each Saturday morning the children and youth meet for two hours to learn the heritage of sacred music in both Latin and English.

The primary purpose of the choir is not to receive praise, but to give glory to God, and to catechize and edify the faithful. Children who have sung with the choir over the years are convinced of the importance of this. They develop a good understanding of sacred music, as well as its proper function in the liturgy. They learn the leadership skills necessary to advance the future of sacred music in the Catholic Church.

The children are excited to sing the chant and polyphony, as it involves them in the parish as leaders. The forty parishioners with whom Father Phillips met in 1988, including but one child, have now persevered to see this Choir of Holy Innocents grow to more than 100 active members

Hmmm... what a nice idea... Hint, hint.

Adoremus also has a piece about The Mundelein Psalter. Good things are happening in Chi-Town.

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National Hymnal

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Adoremus has the first article in a two aprt series about a 1970s project to create a national collection of music approved for use in Catholic worship that failed miserably. In November, the U.S. Bishops conference approved a similar project, which was called for by the Vatican document Liturgiam authenticam.

I have mixed feelings about this. No, actually, they're pretty much all negative. The U.S. is far too big and far too diverse for any such hymnal to be meaningful to everybody. It seems like it would be much more realistic to work on a diocesan hymnal, or maybe a state-wide hymnal.

In fact, I actually would have warmer feelings towards a national hymnal if we had such regional resources already in existence from which it could draw. The way it is, however, I have little confidence that this won't be perceived by most - if not actually created so, which is a real possi---probability - as our liturgical elites telling us what we can and can't sing.

All of this is even before we get into the political aspects of traditional vs. folk vs. praise and worship music which will surely make this whole process exceedingly painful and in the end will likely satisfy none.

It is hard for me to see how this hymnal could be a catalyst of liturgical renewal, in fact, a hymnal that was instead the fruit of actual liturgical renewal would seem to have a better shot at being nationally "relevant," as the kids say.

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Blogwatch

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  • This post and the comments are the funniest thing I've read this year, I think
  • Anthony Esolen: "When our virtues are unmoored from Christ... then our virtues do not counterbalance our vice. They give it ammunition." He gives a pretty good example.
  • Obama believes life starts at conception.
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Del.icio.us users!

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You can now put me on your network. Here is the link.

I signed up mostly so I could put up a little widget over in the sidebar that lets me post links to recent articles. Now, instead of throwing bunches of links up very few days, I can post articles to del.icio.us pretty much as I read them and they will show up on under "MY BOOKMARKS" on the rfar right column. Pretty sweet, huh? I think so.

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Prayers

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The Bettinellis could use your prayers.

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Pope Geeks: take note!

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Great things are happening!

Pope Benedict XVI is due to release two books this spring. The first is the long-awaited Jesus of Nazareth: From the Baptism in the Jordan to the Transfiguration. I forgot to blog them at the time, but in November Sandro Magister had an English translation of a review of the book by papal household preacher Raniero Cantalamessa and in January he had an English translation of the book's preface.

The second book is the one that has caused a crapstorm this week. Apparently it's news that an 80-year old German Catholic priest has reservations about American rockers. The real story is that the Pope is publishing a book about his predecessor. The name of the book is John Paul II, My Beloved Predecessor and the Italian edition is being published next week.

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Watch the Daily Show on Thursday

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And you'll see John Bambenek. I'm not kidding. See for yourself.

Can anybody out there tape it for those of us without cable?

UPDATE: See the video here.

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Freedom of Religion

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In Britain it seems like it will soon be illegal to teach kids that the truth is true.

After this April's implementation of the Sexual Orientation Regulations (SOR's), British religious schools may no longer be allowed to teach school children that the Christian viewpoint on sexual morality is "objectively true," a government report says.

The Joint Committee on Human Rights, made up of members from Parliament and the House of Lords, has issued a report on the implementation of the Regulations recommending that religious schools be required to modify their religious instruction to comply with the government-approved doctrine of "non-discrimination".

Although religious schools will be allowed to remain open and may continue to give instruction in various religious beliefs, instruction must be modified "so that homosexual pupils are not subjected to teaching, as part of the religious education or other curriculum, that their sexual orientation is sinful or morally wrong."

The report says the Regulations will not "prevent pupils from being taught as part of their religious education the fact that certain religions view homosexuality as sinful," but they may not teach "a particular religion's doctrinal beliefs as if they were objectively true".

British priest Tim Finigan is cited in the article. For further developments, keep an eye on his blog.

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Apostolic Exhortation due out next week

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In October 2005, bishops frpom around the world gathered in Rome for a synod on the Eucharist. Today, the Vatican reported that a post-synodal document entitled "Sacramentum Caritatis" or "Sacrament of Love" will be released. This will be the second major document of Benedict XVI's pontificate, and given his voluminous writing on the liturgy and the recent rumors swirling around that he plans to loosen the restrictions on the Tridentine Mass, the document will surely be closely scrutinized. Catholic News Agency has a report that speculates on some of the specific liturgical reforms that might be called for in the document. Though the document will undoubtedly make such prescriptions directed towards the clergy and towards liturgists, we can also expect that there will be a strong emphasis on exhorting the faithful to renew their own inner love and devotion for Jesus in the Sacrament. Whatever happens, this is exciting news indeed!

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Holy Terror

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Novelist Dean Koontz is a Catholic who converted when he was in college. I had no idea, but it figures. (Incidentally, a companion article mentions his unlikely friendship with bio-ethicist Wesley Smith, who, until he corrected the piece on his blog, I always assumed was Catholic).

Speaking of the genre, Stephen King is not a Catholic. It's not up on their website yet, but the February issue of First Things has an outstanding essay by Ross Douthat on the God of King's novels. As a former King fan (I started reading him in 4th grade, which honestly explains some s*** about me), I found the article dead on and a great read.

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Congratulations!

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To the people of Dallas on getting a new bishop!

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Blogwatch

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  • Larison: Moderate-wing extremists
  • Danielle Bean hosts a discussion on sleep, as in not getting enough of it - a topic near and dear to the Lu-household.
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Chrysostom for Today

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Fr. Z. demonstrates the Golden-Mouthed's continuing relevance.

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Uh.... WHAT?!!?

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Yet here is an excerpt from Balthasar’s foreword for the book” Meditations on the Tarot: A Journey Into Christian Hermeticism” (Referred to herein as “Cardinal” Balthasar). “A thinking, praying Christian of unmistakable purity reveals to us the symbols of Christian Hermeticism in its various levels of mysticism, gnosis and magic, taking in also the Cabbala and certain elements of astrology and alchemy. These symbols are summarized in the twenty-two “Major Arcana”of the tarot cards. By way of the Major Arcana, the author seeks to lead meditatively into the deeper, all embracing wisdom of the Catholic mystery.”

-Hans Urs von Balthasar

Uhhh... anybody out there shed some light on this? I can generally deal with the rest of the author's issues with von Balthasar, but this is downright kooky.

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The Boys

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Just for the heck of it, and to please the masses in Chicago and Ohio, here's some more pics of the boys:

Christmas Morning:
ChristmasMorn.JPG

Charlie partaking of 1st birthday cake:
FirstBirthdayCake.JPG

The boys fingerpainting:
Fingerpainting.JPG

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The Boys

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I mentioned a few weeks ago that Mama-Lu and I were in a wedding. Here's pictures of the boys from that evening that I thought I ought to share on account of my boys are studs:

WeddingCharlie.JPG WeddingMatthew.JPG

The only problem here is, can anybody who knows my sister look at that picture of Matthew without seeing her?

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Marriage Advice

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Arthur1.JPG
Or: How to Avoid the Couch

When your King Arthur-obsessed 2 1/2 year old hands your wife a sword and tells her to be the Lady of the Lake, you better be darned sure she's seen Monty Python and the Holy Grail before you call her "my watery tart."

P.S. I did not actually get relegated to the couch, but the initial look I received when I made the comment was enough to ensure the mistake won't be repeated... for, you know, a few days.

P.P.S. In case you're wondering why I haven't posted any pics of the boys in a while, well, you see, we have this problem of losing technology. Don't worry, Rosie, we found the camera. The cell phone, on the other hand...

P.P.P.S. The purpose of this last note is solely to ensure that the picture of Matthew doesn't spill over on top of the post below.

:) (for good measure)

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Around the web

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New stuff:

Old stuff:

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March Papal Prayer Intentions

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Here are the Holy Father's prayer intentions for March:

General Intention: That the Word of God may be ever more listened to, contemplated, loved and lived.

Missionary Intention: That the training of catechists, organizers and lay people committed in the service of the Gospel may be the constant concern of those responsible for the young Churches.

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Close

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If Marquis can come close to pitching like the 300-game winner [Greg Maddux], the Cubs will be in great shape.

"If Papa-Lu can come close to buying out CitiGroup, the Lu- family will be in great shape!"

Carrie Muskrat's over-ratedness (I realize nobody has actually ever rated the Cubs' beat reporter, but I stand by my words) aside, did you that THERE WAS MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL BEING PLAYED TODAY?!!?

Let's play ball today
The Cubs are on their way!

OK, sure they lost, but it's only spring training. And I don't care what the score is, it's great to see a major league box score!

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For the Wife

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Jill Stanek, Michael Corleone and abortion

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Jill Stanek is a tenacious blogger. She was a nurse at Christ hospital in the Chicago area who witnessed babies who survived attempted abortions being left to die. She has nobly fought for the rights of unborn child and for the rights of families since. Her blogging (both at her own blog and at the Illinois Review blog) is often an excellent source of news and commentary about the pro-life movement in Illinois and the shameful shananigans of our state legislature. For instance, here, she shows that if we really wanted to mandate vaccines that would save lives, we would go after the flu, not cervical cancer.

But sometimes, she can be a little crazy. And by a little crazy, I mean insane.

You know the scene at the end of Godfather II, where Kay tells Michael that she aborted their baby and he slaps her? It's pretty much the most depressing scene in movie history. First, there's Kay. Terrified of her husband the murderer, she kills her unborn child. Then we have Michael. This scene marks the bottom of his downward spiral. Faced with the reality that even his own wife, the woman he professes to live, is abhorred by him, he lashes out at her.

Jill Stanek looks at this scene and... well, this is what she sees:

That spontaneous slap was the reaction of a real man who a woman had just told she aborted his baby. Compare that to the modern day cowardly male response, "It's your choice. Whatever you decide, I'll support you." Or worse, his threat to abandon her if she does not abort.

It was this fierce devotion to family that strangely endeared us to the Corleone men despite their otherwise heinous behavior.

We love him because he smacks his wife. You see, it shows how much he loves his family.

--

The Godfather trilogy is the story of the train wreck that is Michael Corleone's life. When we first meet him, he's a war hero, a true Italian-American success story, complete with the WASPy girlfriend. The world is his oyster. As he gets mixed up in the family business. things start falling apart. We start to see it in part 1, where he grows cold dealing with Kay, even refusing to tell her he loves her on the phone. ("Hey Michael! Why don't you tell that nice girl that you love her?") When he flees to Sicily, he marries another woman, who becomes the first casualty of his involvement in the family business when an attempt to kill Michael takes her out instead. He returns to America, reconnects with Kay and marries her. So is he finding redemption? Well, the movie ends with him going on a murder spree (one victim being his sister's husband), lying to Kay about it and in the final scene, we see the actual and metaphorical door being closed on Kay's face, shutting her out of that part of his life.

Part 2 starts with his son's First Communion. The party is a ridiculous event complete with brass band and politicians who don't know his son's name. The event is ostensibly about young Anthony, but it's really about Michael's power and connections and ends with an attempt on Michael's life. The rest of the film documents Michael's descent, culminating in Kay aborting their child and leaving him and then the murder of Fredo.

In part 3, we see Michael is repentant, sort of. He wants out of the crime business, but he still lusts for power, attempting a takeover of the Vatican Bank. Mildly repentant though he may be, and despite his best attempts to reconcile with his estranged family members, the wrecking ball keeps swinging, and by the end of the movie, it claims his daughter - the one person left in the world who still loves him. He dies alone with his corpse being sniffed by the dog.

Back to the actual scene where Kay confesses the abortion. Her whole point is that she had the abortion because he's a villain. The war hero she fell in love with and married and who promised to legitimize the family has become a man whose primary business is violence. So how does he respond? Pow! He turns his ruthlessness towards her.

Contrast this: in part 1, Sonny, who is pretty much a stupid sociopath, comes to the aid his sister when he finds out her husband is beating her. Michael, however, is the wife beater. Along with the murder of Fredo, this scene marks the point where he loses all of our sympathy, as we see that the one virtue he professes, loyalty to family, is not always binding.

In fact, there simply is no virtue in the scene. If we were to look for any pro-life lessons to be drawn, the best we could do would be to say that it points to abortion as a crisis of fatherhoood. Kay is horrified by Michael; she thinks the child inside of her could be another Michael, and she can't stand it. If he loved her, if he treasured her and took care of her, above all by being an honorable man himself, the abortion would never have happened.

I understand what Jill is trying to say. Men should stand up for their children, they should be good men and take care of their families, but how she thinks the pro-life cause is served by using an example like this is beyond me. I'd say that she didn't think before using this example, but even after I called attention to her craziness in the comments of her post, she sticks to her guns. What else can one say? This kind of thing makes every pro-lifer look bad.

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Blogwatchin'

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  • Fr. Z’s 20 Tips For Making A Good Confession
  • Cardinal Justin Rigali of Philadelphia is vlogging for Lent.
  • John Allen has some cautions about the news coming out of Poland.
  • My bishop is podcasting, which is a fantastic technological leap for my diocese, but our webpage is still abysmal.
  • Orthodox priest Joseph Honeycutt reviews The Thrill of the Chaste (btw, I did not know until yesterday that Dawn Eden is coming to Champaign an a week or two). That is an event worth attending.
  • Read everything Tom at Disputations has written since Lent started.
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Ordination

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U of I folks might be interested in these pictures of an old friend at his diaconate ordination in Rome at St. Peter's last October.

Pic 1
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More

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About this Archive

This page is a archive of recent entries written by Papa-Lu in March 2007.

Papa-Lu: February 2007 is the previous archive.

Papa-Lu: April 2007 is the next archive.

Find recent content on the main index or look in the archives to find all content.